Tending To Overthink Things

Here’s a man who has always lived outside society. Although we are talking about 2,000 years ago, in today’s terms he’s like a homeless man who hangs out on a downtown street with a cup or bowl asking for money.

Maybe he picked up some training and education as a young person just listening in on conversations.

Oh, he’s blind. Never has seen anything in his entire life.

Then one day someone comes by and heals his sight. (And his soul, but he didn’t know that then.)

So there are these men in town. They don’t have any obvious job, but they think they are important. And…they do wield some political influence. They could cause people to be killed.

These men have spent their entire lives studying the Scripture. They have post-Docs from the University of Shammai (a famous teacher). They think they know everything that matters.

(Know anyone like that? Likeable people, aren’t they?)

So they bring the homeless guy before them to question how he was healed. And they talk about the man who did the healing and about how he couldn’t possibly be from God. And they get all theological.

And the healed man says, “I do not know if the man is a sinner. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.”

To the man, there is no theology. He was blind, and then he could see.

Instead of rejoicing over a remarkable event, the leaders bound up tightly in their traditions and thinking couldn’t comprehend it.

Later the homeless man meets Jesus and his response is similarly simple yet profound, “I believe.”

We have to believe that from that day the man’s life was completely changed. He lived differently.

In the growth of the early church as recorded in the book of Acts of the Apostles, Luke reported that people joined in large numbers because of how the Christ-followers lived. It was different from everyone else.

The question John (I am telling stories from the Gospel of John chapter 9) leaves us with is do we simply believe–or, do we overthink things and let our theology and tradition get in the way (blind us, if you will) of belief?

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